Whooping cough vaccination for children and adults

The Swiss population is anything but united when it comes to getting vaccinated. The topic of vaccination is highly controversial. We shed some light on the subject. You can decide for yourself which vaccinations make sense for you.

04.07.2017

Lara Brunner

Whooping cough is a highly infectious illness caused by Bordetella pertussis bacteria. It is characterised by repeated coughing bouts over a long period of time. The illness is life-threatening for babies. It is possible to vaccinate against whooping cough. However, the protection is only temporary. Studies show that the vaccination is effective for around five years.

The Harding Centre for Risk Literacy at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development has conducted scientific studies to set out the potential risks and benefits of the whooping cough vaccination and has presented these in a series of model calculations.

If 100 young people and adults without a combined booster shot came into contact with whooping cough bacteria, 45 – 79 would get infected. This figure is reduced to around 3 – 12 out of 100 after vaccination. Without vaccination, between 36 and 77 out of every 100 people would suffer from sustained coughing. This is reduced to between just 2 and 12 out of every 100 people after vaccination.

Further information

Further information

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