Fall prevention

Test your balance

Alongside factors in your environment such as wet floors, both physical and mental attributes (for example, muscle strength and your ability to concentrate) affect your risk of falling.

Test your balance when standing on one leg

Important: Perform this test with a person or an object (such as a chair) next to you. If you lose your balance, you can use them for support.

  1. Stand barefoot (without shoes) on a firm surface.
  2. Fold your arms in front of you.
  3. Look straight ahead and fix your eyes on a specific point.
  4. Lift one of your feet off the ground. Lift the foot only to the height of the ankle on your other leg, and do not touch the other leg.
  5. Start timing yourself when you lift your foot.
  6. Stop timing as soon as you can no longer keep your arms folded in front of you and have to wave them in the air to keep balance or use them to support yourself. Also stop timing if you have to put your raised foot on the floor or swing it in the air to keep balance. If you are still holding your balance after 45 seconds, stop timing.
  7. You have three attempts.
  8. Note your best time.

Please enter your best time here (in seconds):*

Please enter your age here in years

Your balance when standing is good.

Without training, however, we gradually lose our balance as we get older. This increases your risk of falling. Targeted training can help you maintain or even improve your balance. Click here for exercises you can do at home.

Or if you would rather train together with others in a group, there are various classes to choose from here.

Your balance when standing is weak.

Weak balance increases your risk of falling. Targeted training can help you improve your balance. Click here for exercises you can do at home.

Or if you would rather train together with others in a group, there are various classes to choose from here.